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Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

3 edition of Description of a new species of net-winged midge from the Great Basin found in the catalog.

Description of a new species of net-winged midge from the Great Basin

Charles Leonard Hogue

Description of a new species of net-winged midge from the Great Basin

with a key to the North American species of the genus Dioptopsis (Diptera: Blephariceridae)

by Charles Leonard Hogue

  • 81 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History in Los Angeles .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Great Basin.,
  • North America.
    • Subjects:
    • Dioptopsis dismalea.,
    • Dioptopsis.,
    • Insects -- Classification.,
    • Insects -- Great Basin.,
    • Insects -- North America.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 10.

      Statementby Charles L. Hogue.
      SeriesContributions in science,, no. 178
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQ11 .L52 no. 178, QL537.B56 .L52 no. 178
      The Physical Object
      Pagination10 p.
      Number of Pages10
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3888996M
      LC Control Number81450332

      The wetlands around Malheur Lake and the Blitzen River form a wetlands oasis in the basin and has served as habitat for many migratory bird species since before human presence in the Basin. Malheur Lake and most of the Blitzen River valley are now included in and managed by Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. Great Basin Naturalist Volume 51|Number 1 Article 3 The Great Basin NaturalistYear Index, Volumes 1–50, – Jody N. Reid Science Library, Harold B. Lee LibrAuthor: Jody N. Reid, Richard D. Jensen, Nathan M. Smith.

        Description of a new species of net-winged midge from the Great Basin, with a key to the North American species of the genus Dioptopsis. Contributions in Science, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County –Cited by: 1.   Compounds in the saliva alter the growth of the injured plant cells and the tissue produces a swelling, or gall, around the young insects. However, the size, shape and color of the developing gall are typically specific to the gall midge species. On the other hand, one species unusually induces a wide range of gall morphologies. Medusa Galls.

      The number of genera and species is hopelessly huge for angler entomologists to ever learn, and the identifing characteristics often require slide-mounting tiny parts under high-powered microscopes. Even the most Latin-minded fisherman must slip back to the basics--size and color--to describe his local midge hatches. The wheat midge (Sitodiplosis mosellana) is a common agricultural pest found in most areas around the world where wheat crops are grown. Until the recent development of wheat varieties resistant to wheat midge, all wheat varieties were susceptible to damage by the wheat midge, some species being more seriously affected than others. Although.


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Description of a new species of net-winged midge from the Great Basin by Charles Leonard Hogue Download PDF EPUB FB2

Description of a new species of net-winged midge from the Great Basin, with a key to the North American species of the genus Dioptopsis (Diptera: Blephariceridae) View Metadata By: Hogue, Charles L. Description of a new species of net-winged midge from the Great Basin, with a key to the North American species of the genus Dioptopsis (Diptera: Blephariceridae) VolumePage 1.

Description of a new species of net-winged midge from the Great Basin, with a key to the North American species of the genus Dioptopsis (Diptera: Blephariceridae) By Charles L Author: Charles L. Hogue. One species of net-winged midge, belonging to the family Blephariceridae, is known from the island of Dominica.

This project involved examining specimens brought back from Dominica. We compared the morphology of male and female mouthparts, and we concluded that this species expressed sexual dimorphism in their mouthparts.

We also. A new species of Nephelodes Guenee from the Great Basin area of north eastern California (Noctuidae: Hadeninae) EMBED (for hosted blogs and item description> tags) Want more.

Advanced embedding details A new species of Nephelodes Guenee from the Great Basin area of north eastern California (Noctuidae. The Blephariceridae, commonly known as net-winged midges, are a nematoceran family in the order Diptera. The adults resemble crane flies except with a projecting anal angle in the wings, and different head shape, absence of the V on the mesonotum, and more laterally outstretched, forward-facing : Insecta.

Great Basin National Park Superintendent Andy Ferguson stated, "I am very pleased with the way our fourth annual BioBlitz came together.

This event has given us an opportunity to learn much more about park resources and the potential of identifying whole new species.". Net Winged Midges in their hundreds on a Cape Stream T he only real issue in fishing these flies is that they are invisible, to the angler if not the trout, and a two fly rig of a more noticeable dry fly on a dropper and the midge on the point is the only real manner to fish them effectively and have hope of spotting the take.

characters merits description of a new species, placed in a new monotypic genus, with authorship of both new taxa attributed to K. Harris. This species is probably native to southern Africa (where Agapanthus species are endemic) because an undescribed and unstudied gall midge inducing identical.

Midges can be found along the coast, shorelines, and banks of any body of water. Lakes and ponds often see huge congregations of them. Thanks to poor flying ability, they are at the mercy of wind currents and can be blown into backyards. For this reason, they may be considered a nuisance to homeowners.

A new species of gall midge, Procontarinia schreineri Harris, which attacks mango foliage in Guam, is described and the results of field observations on its pest status, biology and population fluctuations are reported. Eggs are laid on young mango leaves and larvae, which develop rapidly over about 5 days, induce blister galls before leaving to by: New midge species named after Paul Hebert.

In an article recently published in the journal Insect Systematics and Evolution, Xiaolong Lin describes eight species of non-biting midges new to science.

“It is particularly rewarding to find and describe new species from a well investigated area such as Norway” says Lin, “but also exciting to find new species from my home country. Gall midges of the genera Trotteria and Verbasciola of the supertribe Lasiopteridi are inquilines.

The widespread genus Trotteria includes 28 species developing in galls of 30 species of gall midges; 24 species develop in galls of Asphondyliidi. The Palaearctic genus Verbasciola comprises three species that have been recorded in galls of three gall-midge species damaging three plant species.

Seven new species are described, Trotteria coronillacola, T. perkovskii, T. cytisiphila, T. kalininae, T. jigulensis, Schizomyia samaralukensis, and Verbasciola : Z. Fedotova. A NEW GENUS AND NEW SPECIES OF GALL MIDGE [CECIDOMYIIDAE: DIPTERA] FROM INDIA v. DESHPANDE, T. SHAIKH* AND R. SHARMA** Post Graduate Dept., of Zoology, Science College, Nanded, MaharashtraIndia ABSTRACT: Descriptions of new genus Kitella and new species orientalis from IndiaFile Size: KB.

Asphondylia pumila (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae: Asphondyliini), a new species of gall midge is described and illustrated. Summer galls occur only on Author: John Plakidas. Endemism, sympatry and a plethora of new species: net-winged midges (Diptera:Blephariceridae:Blepharicera) from the Appalachian Mountains.

Bulletin of the North American Benthological Society [abstract]. This banner text can have markup. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. A midge is any small fly, including species in several families of non-mosquito Nematoceran Diptera. Midges are found (seasonally or otherwise) on practically every land area outside permanently arid deserts and the frigid zones.

Some midges, such as many Phlebotominae (sand fly) and Simuliidae (black fly), are vectors of various : Insecta.

Midge, (family Chironomidae), also called chironomid, nonbiting midge, or gnat, any of a group of tiny two-winged flies (order Diptera) that superficially resemble mosquitoes. Although they resemble mosquitoes, midges are harmless, with small mouthparts that are not elongated into a piercing structure for blood feeding.

Abstract. Three recent genera are included in the supertribe Stomatosematidi: Stomatosema (16 species), Vanchidiplosis (4 species), and Didactylomyia (3 species). Seven species of the genus Stomatosema and two species of the genus Vanchidiplosis occur in the Palaearctic Region. No reliable findings of representatives of the supertribe were known in fossilized Cited by: 5.NOTES ON MOUNTAIN MIDGES (DEUTEROPHLEBIIDAE) WITH A DESCRIPTION OF THE IMMATURE STAGES OF A NEW SPECIES FROM COLORADO [Pennak, Robert W] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Robert W Pennak.New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Bulletin Link VanCuren, R.

T., and M. S. Gustin. Identification of sources contributing to PM and ozone at elevated sites in the western US by receptor analysis: Lassen Volcanic National Park, California, and Great Basin National Park, Nevada.