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Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

4 edition of Stratospheric ozone depletion by halocarbons found in the catalog.

Stratospheric ozone depletion by halocarbons

chemistry and transport

by National Academy of Sciences. National Research Council

  • 158 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementPanel on Stratospheric Chemistry and Transport, Committee on Impacts of Stratospheric Change, Assembly of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, National Research Council.
The Physical Object
Paginationxi, 238 p. :
Number of Pages238
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24947540M
OCLC/WorldCa6189447

International Halocarbon Usage and Global Ozone Depletion Trends. By Clifford Szu. Ozone depletion as evidenced by the area of low ozone concentration over Antarctica. Continued ozone depletion resulting from the catalytic destruction of ozone has caused an area of low ozone concentration over Antarctica to increase in size. Get this from a library! Halocarbons and the stratospheric ozone layer. [George D Havas; Library of Congress. Science and Technology Division. Reference Section.].

Get this from a library! Halocarbons, effects on stratospheric ozone. [Assembly of Mathematical and Physical Sciences (U.S.). Panel on Atmospheric Chemistry.]. Map of global sampling locations for halocarbons and ozone Three gases that make a significant contribution to stratospheric ozone depletion, CFC, CFC and N 2 O, have been monitored by GML since the mids. Since then, numerous additional CFCs, HCFCs, and other halogenated gases have been incorporated into the measurement program as.

Halon's Role in Stratospheric Ozone Depletion The Halon covered by EPA Rule 40 CFR P Subpart H contains the chemical element bromine (Br) and also, in the case of Halon specifically, chlorine (Cl).Br and Cl both contribute to stratospheric ozone destruction. The earth's stratosphere is a layer of the atmosphere that begins between 5 and 11 miles above the earth's surface and. Reactions of metals derived from meteor ablation in the atmosphere and from other sources with stratospheric chlorine compounds are considered in relation to the impact of halocarbons on stratospheric ozone chemistry. Rate coefficients for the formation of metal chlorides from Cl, ClO and HCl at altitudes from 15 and 50 km are presented, and it is pointed out that the ClO and HCl reactions .


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Stratospheric ozone depletion by halocarbons by National Academy of Sciences. National Research Council Download PDF EPUB FB2

Suggested Citation:"SOURCES OF STRATOSPHERIC CHLORINE."National Research Council. Stratospheric Ozone Depletion by Halocarbons: Chemistry and Transport. Stratospheric Ozone Depletion by Halocarbons: Chemistry and Transport National Research Council Price:US $ Quantity:1 Publisher: National Research Council Condition:Used: Very Good Binding: Paperback Dust Jacket (if applicable): Date: ISBN: (if applicable): Unmarked.

Charts and Graphs. (SKU: )Seller Rating: % positive. Get this from a library. Stratospheric ozone depletion by halocarbons: chemistry and transport. [National Research Council (U.S.).

Panel on Stratospheric Chemistry and Transport.; Assembly of Mathematical and Physical Sciences (U.S.). Committee on Impacts of Stratospheric Change.]. Read chapter ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT: Stratospheric Ozone Depletion by Halocarbons: Chemistry and Transport Login Register Cart Help. Stratospheric Ozone Depletion by Halocarbons: Chemistry and Transport () Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

Soteris A. Kalogirou, in Solar Energy Engineering (Second Edition), Halocarbons. Concern over stratospheric ozone depletion has restricted or eliminated production of many halocarbons.

The phase-out of human-produced halocarbons was the result of the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. This guide lists information sources which deal with the deleterious effect of halocarbons (fluorocarbons, chlorocarbons, and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs)) on the stratospheric ozone layer which shields the earth and its inhabitants from excessive ultraviolet radiation from the sun.

Yvon-Lewis, J.H. Butler, in Encyclopedia of Atmospheric Sciences (Second Edition), Synopsis. Anthropogenic halocarbons such as chlorofluorocarbons, CCl 4, and CH 3 CCl 3 are largely responsible for the observed depletion of stratospheric ozone, yet there is a contribution by gases that are both naturally and anthropogenically produced.

Of the naturally produced halocarbons, CH 3 Br. The effects of anthropogenic emissions of nitrous oxide (N 2 O), carbon dioxide (CO 2), methane (CH 4) and the halocarbons on stratospheric ozone (O 3) over the twentieth and twenty-first centuries are isolated using a chemical model of the future evolution of ozone will depend on each of these gases, with N 2 O and CO 2 probably playing the dominant roles as halocarbons.

Ozone depletion and climate change, or Ozone hole and global warming in more popular terms, are environmental challenges whose connections have been explored and which have been compared and contrasted, for example in terms of global regulation, in various studies and books.

There is widespread scientific interest in better regulation of climate change, ozone depletion and air pollution, as. Download a PDF of "Stratospheric Ozone Depletion by Halocarbons" by the National Research Council for free. A PDF is a digital representation of the print book, so while it can be loaded into most e-reader programs, it doesn't allow for resizable text or advanced, interactive functionality.

Ozone depletion describes two distinct but related phenomena observed since the late s: (1) a steady decline in the total amount of ozone in earth’s stratosphere (i.e., the ozone layer), and (2) a much larger springtime decrease in stratospheric ozone around earth’s polar regions.

The latter phenomenon is referred to as the ozone hole. Halon has an ozone depleting potential 10 times that of CFC Although the use of halons in developed countries has been phased out sincethe atmospheric concentration of these potent, long-lived ozone destroyers is still rising by an estimated 11 to 15% annually.

To date halons have accounted for about 5% of global ozone depletion. Regulations with the Halocarbon Control Chapter (Chapter) under the authority of The Environmental Management and Protection Act, (EMPA, ).

The Chapter continues to address stratospheric ozone-depletion and limiting the impacts that halocarbons have on the ozone layer. The objective of this Chapter is to eliminate halocarbon emissions that. Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX A: THE TREATMENT OF UNCERTAINTIES."National Research Council.

Stratospheric Ozone Depletion by Halocarbons: Chemistry and Transport. A loss of stratospheric ozone results in more harmful UV-B radiation reaching the Earth's surface. The Antarctica “Ozone Hole: In the s a large springtime depletion of stratospheric ozone was observed and was getting worse each following year.

This ozone loss was described in by British researcher Joe Farman and his colleagues. Halocarbons: Ozone Depletion and Global Warming Overview PAGE 1 OF 5 Halocarbons are chemical compounds containing carbon, one or more halogens, and sometimes hydrogen.

Some halocarbons (“ozone depleting substances,” or ODSs) deplete the ozone layer, while others (“greenhouse gases,” or GHGs) are thought to contribute to global warming.

In contrast, stratospheric ozone depletion rep - resents a small negative forcing, which leads to cooling of Earth’s surface. Halocarbons include all ODSs, their substitutes, and a few other gases (see Figure Q). In the coming decades, ODS abundances and stratospheric ozone depletion are expected to.

This global decrease in stratospheric ozone is well correlated with rising levels of chlorine and bromine in the stratosphere from the manufacture and release of CFCs and other rbons are produced by industry for a variety of uses, such as refrigerants (in refrigerators, air conditioners, and large chillers), propellants for aerosol cans, blowing agents for making plastic.

The term ozone depletion is used to describe two distinct but related observations: a slow, steady decline, of about 3% per decade, in the total amount of ozone in the earth's stratosphere during the past twenty years and a much larger, but seasonal, decrease in stratospheric ozone over the earth's polar regions during the same period.

(The latter phenomenon is commonly referred to as the. Stratospheric ozone depletion leads to surface cooling, while the observed increases in tropospheric ozone and other greenhouse gases lead to surface warming. The cooling from Halocarbons Ozone increase due to other gases Ozone decrease due to ODSs From changes in greenhouse gases caused by human activities between and.

Ozone Depletion. Ozone depletion is due to the degradation of stratospheric ozone from the emissions of ozone depleting substances, for example, long-lived chlorine and bromine-containing gases [e.g., chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), and halons].

From: Processing and Sustainability of Beverages, Related terms.CHAPTER STRATOSPHERIC OZONE. The stratospheric ozone layer, centered at about 20 km above the surface of the Earth (Figure ), protects life on Earth by absorbing UV radiation from the this chapter we examine the mechanisms controlling the abundance of ozone in the stratosphere and the effect of human [email protected]{osti_, title = {Ozone crisis}, author = {Roan, S}, abstractNote = {The author presents an account of the depletion of the atmosphere's ozone layer since the discovery of the phenomenon 15 years ago.

The book recounts the flight to ban chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's) and describes the science, the people, and the politics involved, up to the March international treaty.